BED AND BREAKFAST IN BOLOGNA   ACCOMMODATION IN BOLOGNA   ERBORISTERIA   WEBMASTER

 

 

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Home page. This is the beginning of our travel...

In 1506 Pope Julius 11 aroused the discontented people against the Bentivoglio domination and restored the legate authority above a Senate composed yet again of noble men. This regime lasted for about three centuries, and made Bologna the second most important town, after Rome, of the Papal States.
The fall of the Bentivoglio, brought about by their enemies, the Malvezzi, took place in 1506. Their palace was destroyed by wave of violence, thus producing the wellknown "Guasto" (ruins) from which the Via del Guasto and the recently designed Giardino del Guasto, near the Municipal Theatre, get their names; this was, in fact, the area were the "palazzo" stood, because the present Palazzo Bentivoglio, at No. 8 Via Belle Arti, was built in a later period, 1550-60, probably by Bartolomeo Triachini. At this point Bologna lost all its autonomy and became the "second town" after Rome, the capital of the Northern Papal States. In recognition of its new role Pope Clement VII in 1530 crowned Charles V as Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire in the St. Petronio church.
The Papal Court very often came to Bologna, (here, as early as 1515, Leon X met Francis I King of France). Probably Luther saw here, not in Rome, the curial pomp which finally convinced him to carry out the Reformation.
Following the Bentivoglio tradition in the first part of the XVI century important "foreign" architects were invited to Bologna where they created the first architectural examples which the future Bolognese architects would follow.

The Palazzo dei Banchi, named after the bankers' shops it housed, was brought to its present shape according to a project by Jacopo Barozzi, called "11 Vignola"; it completed Piazza Maggiore hiding with its large architectural span, the hovels built along the old market streets (Via Pescherie Vecchie, Via Drapperie, Via Clavature);
access to these streets is through the arches of the portico. Together with the Vignola - to whom the "palazzi" Bocchi (No. 21, Via Goito) and Boncompagni (No. 8, Via del Monte) are ascribed - other great "foreign" architects working in Bologna in that period were: Baldassarre Peruzzi, who planned the Ghisilardi chapel in St. Domenico and, perhaps, the Palazzo Albergati at No.s 26 -28 of Via Saragozza; Giulio Romano, who, besides the project prepared for St. Petronio left us the tomb of Lodovico di Boccadiferro in St.Francesco; Andrea Marchesi di Formigine to whom the following works are ascribed: the portico of St. Bartolomeoin StradaMaggiore, the Palazzo Dal Monte. at No.s 3-5 of Via Galliera, the Palazzo Fantuzzi (in collaboration with others) at No. 23 of Via St. Vitale, the Palazzo Salina-Amorini, at No.s 9-11 of Via St. Stefano, the Palazzo Paselli at No. 4 of Via St. Maria Maggiore. These "foreign" architects created examples which the Bolognese architects would follow for future work in the city, from the second half of the 16th Century. Besides the palaces mentioned above, 15thCentury Bolognese architecture can be noted in the following important buildings; the Archiginnasio (see); in Via Zamboni there are the palaces Malvezzi de' Medici , Salem Magnani , Riario, Poggi ); in Via St. Vitale the Orsi.
 

 

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General - Environment - Iron and Etruscan Age - Roman Age - Patron Saint- The Commune - Alma mater studiorum - Re Enzo - Porticoes - St Peter - Gothic - 14th Century - Piazza Maggiore - Aristocratic palaces - Brick and other stones - Early 15th Century - Archiginnasio - Counter Reformation Renaissance - 16th Century - Great portico ribbons - Frescoes in palaces - The "scenographic" cityNapoleon's republics - Fall of Church power - The Restoration - Haussmann style - The new Century - Floreal style - Rationalism - World War - Active preservation - Around 2000